No Man’s Sky Next seeks to right the game’s wrongs

No Man’s Sky Next seeks to right the game’s wrongs

3:23pm, 17th July, 2018
For a certain kind of gamer, the premise of , that of an endless procedurally generated space universe teeming with life, was intoxicatingly perfect, almost too good to be true. After overselling that dream to the disappointment of just about everybody, Hello Games is back to make amends with a major new update: . No Man’s Sky Next will introduce a spate of updates, including long-awaited full multiplayer gameplay, a visual update to improve textures and add detail, first to third-person perspective switching, unlimited base building and command freighters that allow you to create, upgrade and dispatch a fleet of ships from the comfort of your own bridge. You can see a few of those changes implemented in the trailer below. The update, which will hit on July 24 as a free update to PlayStation and PC, also brings the advent of No Man’s Sky for the Xbox — great news for some console gamers who wanted to check it out without committing to a whole new system. Whether No Man’s Sky Next will truly flesh out and deepen the innovative exploration game in a satisfying way remains to be seen, but both longtime players and those who followed along with curious hesitation now have something to look forward to. Happily, the wait won’t be long.
Ubisoft now auto-bans Rainbow Six Siege players who use toxic language

Ubisoft now auto-bans Rainbow Six Siege players who use toxic language

11:05am, 17th July, 2018
Ubisoft has implemented a new system in Rainbow Six Siege that bans players for using toxic language in the text chat, according to . Yesterday, a number of players started whining about being temporarily banned from the game after using a racist or homophobic slur in the text chat. The first offense results in a 27 minute ban. Second and third offenses will cost players 2 hours of game time, and any following toxic language will result in an official investigation and potentially a permanent ban from the game. Like most games, Ubisoft’s Rainbow Six Siege has a that forbids “any language or content deemed illegal, dangerous, threatening, abusive, obscene, vulgar, defamatory, hateful, racist, sexist, ethically offensive or constituting harassment.” However, most games do close to nothing to enforce these rules, which has led to an overwhelmingly toxic gaming community overall. This new banning system doesn’t come out of the blue. Ubisoft has been talking about removing toxic language from the platform for a while. In fact, the dev team wrote in April that it has plans to add new features to limit the use of offensive language on the game. From the : Our team is working on the creation of an automated system that will censor text chat in game based on a chat filter list. This will replace words that have been identified as offensive and provide players with a notification that their language was found to be unacceptable. We will also be tracking the number of times players trigger this filter and will take action as necessary for players that are intentionally having a negative impact on other player’s gaming experience. The current iteration of the banning system doesn’t censor the offensive words in text chat but rather goes straight to the 27-minute ban. The gaming world has grown into an increasingly toxic environment, as there has been little to no policing of users’ behavior and communication. But eSports and Twitch are putting gamers in the spotlight, and brand endorsements are a huge piece of the upward trajectory of esports. But no brand is going to get behind a gamer that uses homophobic or racial slurs. Ubisoft says on Twitter that the ban system is still being updated and the team is taking feedback from the community to continue refining it, as well as punishing players who are cheating. No system is perfect, but it is working as intended in a majority of the cases we've been seeing. This is not our final update for dealing with toxicity — we will continue to observe and make changes and expansions as needed. — Rainbow Six Siege (@Rainbow6Game)
Former Visceral Director Reveals What Dead Space 4 Could Have Been

Former Visceral Director Reveals What Dead Space 4 Could Have Been

10:34am, 15th July, 2018
According to the former creative director at Visceral Games, there was already an outline about what the now defunct game studio was thinking about doing with the third-person survival-horror game if ever an opportunity was presented to take the next step and bridge the events of Dead Space...
Fortnite’s Summer Skirmish kicks off today, with $8 million prize pool

Fortnite’s Summer Skirmish kicks off today, with $8 million prize pool

12:09pm, 14th July, 2018
Fortnite Battle Royale has swept the gaming world. Alongside its 125 million users and record-breaking Twitch streams, the game has also drawn many competitive players away from their usual titles to try their hand at Battle Royale. Today, that competitive play reaches at inflection point. At 4pm ET, will kick off, with $8 million going to tournament winners over the course of the competition, with a whopping $250K going to the winners of today’s tournament. This isn’t the first competitive Fortnite tournament we’ve seen. Celebrity Twitch streamer Ninja held a charity tournament in April, and Epic held a ProAm tournament combining competitive players and celebs who play Fortnite in June. Plus, sites like UMG and CMG have been holding smaller tournaments since Fortnite first rose to popularity. And then there are $20K Fortnite Friday tournaments for streamers held by UMG. But today, the ante has most certainly been upped. This will be one of the highest paying Fortnite tournaments to date, and is yet just a small fraction of Epic Games’ for competitive play this year. For some context, Dota 2 (previously the biggest competitive esports title out there) had a for the International Championship tournament in 2017, with the winners taking home $10.8 million. Call of Duty, one of the most popular titles over the last decade, is only paying out $1.5 million for its own Champs tournament this summer. In other words, Fortnite is catching up quickly to the competitive gaming scene, not only in terms of talent but money. Epic Games’ Fortnite pulled in a record-breaking $318 million in June alone. In fact, Battle Royale is generating so much revenue for Epic that the company is . But with that growth comes increased scrutiny. Though the company is passing along its fortunes to developers on the Unreal Engine and competitive players, some have noticed situations in which Epic might have been a bit stingy. Fortnite should put the actual rap songs behind the dances that make so much money as Emotes. Black creatives created and popularized these dances but never monetized them. Imagine the money people are spending on these Emotes being shared with the artists that made them — Chance The Rapper (@chancetherapper) The stream for Fortnite Summer Skirmish begins at 4pm ET and is embedded below: