Twitch launches a ‘how-to’ site for streamers, Twitch Creator Camp

Twitch launches a ‘how-to’ site for streamers, Twitch Creator Camp

12:53pm, 24th July, 2018
wants more people to stream, so it’s going to begin teaching them how. The video game streaming site today announced the launch of , a new educational resource that helps newcomers learn the basics of streaming, as well as how to build up a channel, connect with fans, and earn rewards. The launch of the how-to site comes about a week after detailed the long tail of Twitch streamers, with a focus on those who spend years broadcasting to no one in the hopes of one day gaining a following. The article raised the question that, in the age of live streaming, where every major social company – including Facebook, Instagram and YouTube – today offers easy streaming tools, there many not be enough of an audience for all the content creators are producing. Twitch, apparently, believes the issue is one that can be addressed – at least in part – by training new streamers. On Twitch Creator Camp, the company is bringing in successful creators to help educate the would-be streamers on a variety of often-discussed topics. These insights will be shared as articles, videos and live streams. At launch, the site includes content focused on a variety of streaming best practices, including the basics of setting up a channel, building a brand, leveraging their stats, using Twitch features like emotes, badges and extensions, and more. Streamers will also learn how to better network with others and engage their audience, as well as how to optimize their channel for monetization through subscriptions, merchandise, ads and sponsorships. In addition, creators will begin live streaming on Creator Camp, starting on July 31 at 2 PM PT. At this time, a number of Twitch Partners will answer general questions about streaming. A calendar of upcoming streams is also available on Twitch’s site, as the company aims to host weekly sessions going forward. “Hosting a good stream isn’t easy. We’ve heard from many of our creators that they spend a lot of time searching for advice on effective tools, features, and techniques in order to make their broadcasts more engaging and to grow their communities,” said Jessica Messinger, Creator Growth Marketing Manager at Twitch, in a statement. “Twitch Creator Camp makes things simpler by centralizing the most relevant information to a creator’s success, all of which is provided by Twitch and many of our successful Partners. We want to help our creators succeed and this is just the beginning,” she added. Twitch says the partners it’s working with for Creator Camp are being compensated for their efforts. Currently, those participating include: Jericho, gassymexican, teawrex, JGhosty, pokket, firedragon, venalis, tominationtime, sypherpk, xmiramira, iamBrandon, DeejayKnight, Lobosjr, sacriel, PmsProxy, itmeJP, kaypealol, and Pokimane. Twitch today has over 2.2 million broadcasters serving up streams on its site every month, which are consumed by 15 million daily active viewers who watch an average of 95 minutes of content daily. However, much of the on-site activity – just like on YouTube and elsewhere – is dominated by top creators. Meanwhile, many of Twitch’s smaller streamers may already understand the basics and tips that Twitch’s Creator Camp is offering. For them, the issue is not one of following all the steps being laid out, but rather one of discovery. Twitch has been working to address its discovery issues, too, having last month a number of it’s working on across this front which are in various phases of development. “We don’t believe Twitch should be a popularity contest” the company said at the time. Twitch Creator Camp is open as of today, with the live streams starting at the end of the month.
Microsoft is building low-cost, streaming-only Xbox, says report

Microsoft is building low-cost, streaming-only Xbox, says report

7:41pm, 23rd July, 2018
It was revealed at E3 last month that was building a cloud gaming system. A calls that system Scarlett Cloud and it’s only part of Microsoft’s next-gen Xbox strategy. And it makes a lot of sense, too. According to Thurrott.com, noted site for all things Microsoft, the next Xbox will come in two flavors. One will be a traditional gaming console where games are processed locally. You know, like how it works on game systems right now. The other system will be a lower-powered system that will stream games from the cloud — most likely, Microsoft’s Azure cloud. This streaming system will still have some processing power, which is in part to counter latency traditionally associated with streaming games. Apparently part of the game will run locally while the rest is streamed to the system. The streaming Xbox will likely be available at a much lower cost than the traditional Xbox. And why not. Microsoft has sold Xbox systems with a slim profit margin, relying on sales of games and online services to make up the difference. A streaming service that’s talked about on Thurrott would further take advantage of this model while tapping into Microsoft’s deep understanding of cloud computing. A few companies have tried streaming full video games. Onlive was one of the first; while successful for a time, it eventually went through a before a in 2012. Sony offers an extensive library of PS2, PS3 and PS4 games for streaming through its PlayStation Now service. Nvidia got into the streaming game this year and offers a small selection of streaming through GeForce Now. But these are all side projects for the companies. and do not have the global cloud computing platform of Microsoft, and if Microsoft’s streaming service hits, it could change the landscape and force competitors to reevaluate everything.
Pokémon GO gets ‘Lucky’ Pokémon obtainable only by trading

Pokémon GO gets ‘Lucky’ Pokémon obtainable only by trading

5:32pm, 23rd July, 2018
Pokémon GO just got a little surprise update, complete with a curious new feature: “Lucky” Pokémon. Most things in Pokémon GO are adapted from things that already exist in the Pokémon universe. Items like incense, lucky eggs and the like all exist in the main Pokémon series (though what these items actually do tends to be a bit different in GO). Lucky Pokémon, as far as I know, is a new concept altogether. So what are they? And how are they different from existing Shiny Pokémon? Shiny Pokémon are rare variations of existing Pokémon with colors that differ from the standard. You might tap on your 398th Dratini, for example, only to find that it’s bright pink instead of the standard blue. You might randomly tap a Minun to find that it has green ears instead of blue, or an Aron with red eyes instead of blue. It’s a fun way to keep players tapping on Pokémon even after their Pokédex is technically complete. The differences are only skin deep, though; beyond the visual shift, Shiny Pokémon are generally functionally the same as their non-shiny version. The new “Lucky” Pokémon, meanwhile, don’t look much different (save for a sparkly background when you look at them in your collection). They do, however, have a little functional advantage: powering them up requires less stardust. In other words, you’ll be able to make them stronger faster and with less work. How do you get ’em? By trading. While folks are still working out the exact mechanics, it looks like non-Lucky Pokémon have a chance to become Lucky Pokémon when traded from one player to another. , the odds of a Pokémon becoming “lucky” after a trade increase based on how long ago it was originally caught. And for the collectors out there: yes, for better or worse, “Lucky” Pokémon are now a category in the Pokédex. Niantic just added a month ago, and this is a clever way to get players to care about trading even after they’ve already caught everything there is to catch. This update also brings a few other small changes, mostly just polishing up the way the friend/trading system works: You can now give friends nicknames. That’s super useful for remembering who is who, or for remembering that you added PikaFan87 because they promised to trade you a Kangaskhan You now get a bit of XP for sending gifts Gifts can now contain stardust You can now delete gifts from your inventory
Stardew Valley Is Getting A Multiplayer Update

Stardew Valley Is Getting A Multiplayer Update

1:59pm, 23rd July, 2018
The farming simulator is getting a much requested update featuring the ability to play through the game with several friends via a multiplayer mode, which is set to go live this summer. The update will actually go live even sooner than you may have been expecting.
Castlevania's Physical Release Is Coming

Castlevania's Physical Release Is Coming

5:20pm, 22nd July, 2018
The first season of Netflix's Castlevania is about to be unleashed upon the world, no longer tethered to its streaming home. Thanks to a partnership with Viz Media, we can now confirm that a physical edition is on the way.
Why MercurySteam Loves Working With Nintendo

Why MercurySteam Loves Working With Nintendo

3:02pm, 22nd July, 2018
For MercurySteam, the developers of games like Castlevania: Lords of Shadow and Raiders of the Broken Planet, the team has nothing but love for working with Nintendo. The Spanish developers actually explained why there's so much love for Nintendo.
Fortnite's Summer Skirmish Winner Accused Of Cheating

Fortnite's Summer Skirmish Winner Accused Of Cheating

12:44pm, 22nd July, 2018
Recently there was a new event that Epic Games hosted for Fortnite called the Summer Skirmish, and it gave gamers an opportunity to familiarize themselves with the game world while winning some cool prizes, but some people are calling foul on the winner.
Here's What's Coming To Twitch Prime In August

Here's What's Coming To Twitch Prime In August

10:26am, 22nd July, 2018
Amazon's Twitch.tv service is trying to gain a foothold in the digital subscription arena with Twitch Prime, and the company has been adding free games to giveaway along with the subscription each month. The games for August were recently revealed, giving Twitch Prime members an idea of what's in...
Sales Numbers Indicate VR Is In Trouble

Sales Numbers Indicate VR Is In Trouble

8:38pm, 21st July, 2018
Virtual Reality gaming is in a unique place. The hardware seems to be doing well, but is that well enough to keep developers interested? According to a recent study, the answer to that question might be no.