Soul Calibur VI Producer Apologizes For The Way Tira Was Announced

Soul Calibur VI Producer Apologizes For The Way Tira Was Announced

10:26pm, 27th August, 2018
The issue came in with the way Bandai Namco announced one of the popular series' favorites, Tira, who was announced for Soul Calibur VI as a day-one DLC purchase. This did not sit well with fans at all, forcing the producer to come forward to apologize about the announcement.
Microsoft unveils Xbox All Access, a new hardware/software subscription plan with no upfront cost

Microsoft unveils Xbox All Access, a new hardware/software subscription plan with no upfront cost

12:40pm, 27th August, 2018
(Via Microsoft) Microsoft today unveiled a new Xbox subscription plan that lets gamers pay for a console and play games for a monthly price. Called , the two-year contract starts at $21.99 per month for a new Xbox One S, an subscription, and an Xbox . The monthly fee goes up to $34.99 per month for an Xbox One X. Customers can keep the hardware after the contract expires. The confirms earlier reports about Xbox All Access, which is only available at Microsoft Stores in the U.S. for a limited time. Microsoft said gamers can save more than $130 by signing up for the Xbox One S All Access plan, versus buying the console outright with the attached subscriptions. “This is one of the most value-driven ways to join the Xbox family we’ve ever offered,” Microsoft wrote in a blog post Monday. Offering an All Access-style subscription is a “potentially seismic disruption to the typical video game console’s sales model,” GeekWire contributor Thomas Wilde last week. “In a lot of ways, this is the natural evolution of the ‘games as service’ model that’s been driving a lot of the industry’s digital offerings for the last few years, and Microsoft has been transparent about its desire to ,” Wilde . All Access also gives gamers a chance to play Xbox without needing to drop hundreds of dollars at once on a console. In June, Microsoft that it is building a “game streaming network to unlock console-quality gaming on any device.” The company is also working on two new Xbox consoles, including a lower-cost option powered by Microsoft’s cloud streaming service.
What Changed With Assassin's Creed's Combat Update

What Changed With Assassin's Creed's Combat Update

4:34pm, 26th August, 2018
The latest Assassin's Creed that is set in Greece, aptly titled Assassin's Creed: Odyssey, takes the combat to a whole new level by updating how players engage with the enemies and what sort of tactical mechanics will be at their disposal during battle.
Something Strange Just Appeared On The Fortnite Map

Something Strange Just Appeared On The Fortnite Map

3:16pm, 25th August, 2018
What's in the box?! That's exactly what Fortnite players want to know after the latest series of mysterious in-game events has resulted in a massive purple cube dropping onto the popular battle royale game's map.
Fortnite’s Android installer shipped with an Epic security flaw

Fortnite’s Android installer shipped with an Epic security flaw

9:04pm, 24th August, 2018
has clapped back in tremendous fashion at Epic Games, which earlier this month decided to make the phenomenally popular Fortnite available for Android . Unfortunately, the installer had a phenomenally dangerous security flaw in it that would allow a malicious actor to essentially install any software they wanted. Google wasted exactly zero time pointing out this egregious mistake. By way of a short explanation why this was even happening, Epic explained when it announced its plan that it would be good to have “competition among software sources on and that the best would “succeed based on merit.” Everyone of course understood that what he meant was that Epic didn’t want to share the revenue from its cash cow with Google, which takes 30 percent of in-app purchases. Many warned that this was a security risk for several reasons, for example that users would have to enable app installations from unknown sources — something most users have no reason to do. And the Play Store has other protections and features, visible and otherwise, that are useful for users. Google, understandably, was not amused with Epic’s play, which no doubt played a part in the decision to scrutinize the download and installation process — though I’m sure the safety of its users was also a motivating factor. And wouldn’t you know it, they found a whopper right off the bat. In a thread posted a week after the Fortnite downloader went live, that the installer basically would allow an attacker to install anything they want using it. The Fortnite installer basically downloads an APK (the package for Android apps), stores it locally, then launches it. But because it was stored on shared external storage, a bad guy could swap in a new file for it to launch, in what’s called a “man in the disk” attack. And because the installer only checked that the name of the APK is right, as long as the attacker’s file is called “com.epicgames.fortnite,” it would be installed! Silently, and with lots of extra permissions too, if they want, because of how the unknown sources installation policies work. Not good! Edward pointed out this could be fixed easily and in a magnificently low-key bit of shade-throwing helpfully linked to a page on the Android developer site outlining the basic feature Epic should have used. To Epic’s credit, its engineers jumped on the problem immediately and had a fix in the works by that very afternoon and deployed by the next one. Epic InfoSec then requested Google to wait 90 days before publishing the information. As you can see, Google was not feeling generous. One week later (that’s today) and the flaw has been published on the Google Issue Tracker site in all its… well, not glory exactly. Really, the opposite of glory. This seems to have been Google’s way of warning any would-be Play Store mutineers that they would not be given gentle handling. Epic Games CEO Tim Sweeney was likewise unamused. — which, by the way, predicted that this exact thing would happen — he took the company to task for its “irresponsible” decision to “endanger users.” Epic genuinely appreciated Google’s effort to perform an in-depth security audit of Fortnite immediately following our release on Android, and share the results with Epic so we could speedily issue an update to fix the flaw they discovered. However, it was irresponsible of Google to publicly disclose the technical details of the flaw so quickly, while many installations had not yet been updated and were still vulnerable. An Epic security engineer, at my urging, requested Google delay public disclosure for the typical 90 days to allow time for the update to be more widely installed. Google refused. You can read it all at https://issuetracker.google.com/issues/112630336 Google’s security analysis efforts are appreciated and benefit the Android platform, however a company as powerful as Google should practice more responsible disclosure timing than this, and not endanger users in the course of its counter-PR efforts against Epic’s distribution of Fortnite outside of Google Play. Indeed, companies really should try not to endanger their users for selfish reasons.
Assassin's Creed Origins Composer Joins BioWare's Anthem

Assassin's Creed Origins Composer Joins BioWare's Anthem

8:52pm, 24th August, 2018
Anthem is due out next year, with BioWare aiming to create a grand, sweeping sci-fi adventure. To make sure the score is just as grand and sweeping, they've brought in Assassin's Creed Origins vet Sarah Schachner to craft the sounds of a new universe.
How Fortnite Is Encouraging Players To Secure Their Accounts

How Fortnite Is Encouraging Players To Secure Their Accounts

6:34pm, 24th August, 2018
Not everyone heeds the common advice for account protection, and Epic Games decided that instead of letting this ill practice continue on, the company wanted to give gamers an incentive for playing a game like Fortnite and taking the extra step to secure their accounts, and they're doing...